Chipping Barnet Labour Presents

“Chipping Barnet Labour presents…..” – a series of open talks, which aim to engage and inform the public on things that matter to us all

Holly Rigby – Meritocracy: “Does Labour need more radical educational policies?”

We are delighted to welcome Holly Rigby for the first in this season’s “Chipping Barnet Labout Presents”: open and informative talks free to the public, on topics that matter to all of us. Holly Rigby has taught for the last five years in an inner London academy school. She is currently researching the National Education Service part-time at King’s College London and writes regularly for The Guardian. In this talk she draws on her experience as a teacher as well as evidence-based research, to discuss radical ways in which education policy could be reshaped. Could a change to university admission policies drive greater investment in state education? Would a 4-day week for teachers be feasible and what differences would it make to students? What practical and policy changes can we make to ensure that we are genuinely offering a fair and positive educational experience for the many not the few?

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Dr Jo Littler – Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility (June 18th 2018)

We were delighted to welcome Dr Jo Littler as the next speaker for our Chipping Barnet Labour Presents series. Meritocracy today involves the idea that whatever your social position at birth, society ought to offer enough opportunity and mobility for ‘talent’ to combine with ‘effort’ in order to ‘rise to the top’. This idea is one of the most prevalent social and cultural tropes of our time, as palpable in the speeches of politicians as in popular culture. In this talk Jo Littler argued that meritocracy is the key cultural means of legitimation for contemporary neoliberal culture – and that whilst it promises opportunity, it in-fact creates new forms of social division.

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Professor David Nutt – Time to take politics out of UK drug and alcohol policy? (May 9th 2018)

“Chipping Barnet Labour Presents” is excited to welcome Professor David Nutt for the next in our series of free talks.

Professor Nutt is the director of the Neuropsychopharmacology Unit in the Dvision of Brain Sciences, and a previous advisor to the government on drugs policy. He was the clinical scientific lead on the 2004/5 UK Government Foresight initiative “Brain science, addiction and drugs” that provided a 25-year vision for this area of science and public policy. He broadcasts widely to the general public both on radio and television including BBC science and public affairs programmes on therapeutic as well as illicit drugs, their harms and their classification.

This talk focussed on the history of drug controls over the past century and how they may have done more harm than good. Professor Nutt showed multi-criteria decision analyses on the different harms of different drugs and discussed new approaches to policy. Finally explained how New Labour fell in to the trap of being harder on drugs than the Tories, and he discussed the need for the party to now develop a more honest and evidence based approach to drug policy.

Professor Nutt is currently President of the European Brain Council. Previously he has been President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) and the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP). In addition he is a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians and of Psychiatrists and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

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Sarah Corbett – The Art of Gentle Activism(March 14th 2018)

If we want a world that is beautiful, kind and fair, shouldn’t our activism be beautiful, kind and fair?

“Chipping Barnet Labour Presents” is delighted to welcome Sarah Corbett, the award-winning campaigner, consultant, author and founder of the global Craftivist Collective. Their gentle protest approach aims to change the world with deliberate, thoughtful actions that provoke reflection and respectful conversation instead of aggression and division. Craftivism is for everyone from skilled crafters to burnt out activists, and those people who want to challenge injustice in the world but don’t know what to do, where to start or how to prioritise their energies and time.

In this talk, Sarah spoke about how she came to this approach, and about some of her ongoing national and international projects, including ‘A Positive Note’ – speaking out for mental health (in collaboration with Mind), as well as the work she has led to persuade M&S to pay their staff the living wage. Her book “How To Be A Craftivist: the art of gentle protest” came out in October 2017 and has already been a huge hit. Sarah works with a wide range of organisation from NGOs and art institutions to universities, and she creates kits and tools for people to take part alone or with others wherever they are in the world.

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Peter Kinderman – Mental Health, Politics and Social Justice (February 12th 2018)

The second speaker in our “Chipping Barnet Labour presents…” series is Peter Kinderman, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool and former President of the British Psychological Society. He has a keen passion for the promotion of fundamental human rights, democracy, and social justice. His popular book, “A Prescription for Psychiatry”, argues that that our mental health, like so many other aspects of our wellbeing, is fundamentally shaped by social and psychological determinants. In this talk he discussed why this places our mental health policy – our thinking, not just our priorities for funding – squarely in a political space. He will explain why this makes psychologists and politicians partners in a campaign for social justice, with implications for both.

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Danny Dorling – The Future of Britain(January 22nd 2018)

Danny is a brilliant speaker and author, whose work focuses on housing, health, employment, education, wealth and poverty. This is what he spoke about:

Brexit Vote 2016, Hung Parliament 2017, what in 2018? This illustrated talk offers some explanations for what has recently happened and suggests that in 2018 we will see falling economic inequality, but not celebrate it. The next step is understanding that we are not going to become the richest large country in the world, despite George Osborne’s 2015 promise. We never were – but we could slowly learn to be more normal, kinder, and more understanding. And we would then be much better off in terms of what really matters most.

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